Consumer behaviour buying having and being pdf

 

    Consumer Behavior downloading, Having, and Being Tenth Edition Global Edition Michael R. Solomon Saint Joseph's University and The University of Manchester . School of Marketing & International Business MARK (DISTANCE) downloadER BEHAVIOUR Trimester One COURSE OUTLINE Contact Details The. Consumer behaviour is more than downloading things; it also embraces the a contemporary framework based around a downloading, having and being.

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    Consumer Behaviour Buying Having And Being Pdf

    Request PDF on ResearchGate | On Jan 1, , Michael R. Solomon and others published Consumer Behavior: downloading, Having, and Being. Download this document for Consumer Behaviour at Maastricht University for free and find more useful study materials for your Consumer behavior - downloading, having, and being, 10th ed by Michael R Solomon, pdf. Find all the study resources for Consumer Behavior: downloading Having and Being by Michael R. Solomon.

    In anticipation of splurging on delicious food, she is eating very little today. Janice is using a to help her estimate consumption over time and regulate her behavior. A constructive process B mental budget C diet D cognitive process Answer: B Diff: 1 Learning Outcome: Identify and discuss the factors influencing consumer buying behavior. Skill: Concept Objective: AACSB: Application of knowledge 2 In a thought process called , we evaluate the effort we'll need to make a particular choice and then we tailor the amount of cognitive "effort" we expend to make that choice. A utility processing B experiential processing C constructive processing D behavioral processing Answer: C Diff: 2 Learning Outcome: Identify and discuss the factors influencing consumer buying behavior. Skill: Concept Objective: 3 A customer buying an unfamiliar product that carries a fair degree of risk would most likely engage in what type of decision-making? A cognitive decision-making B limited decision-making C habitual decision-making D affective decision-making Answer: A Diff: 2 Learning Outcome: Identify and discuss the factors influencing consumer buying behavior.

    The National Library may be able to supply you with a photocopy or electronic copy of all or part of this item, for a fee, depending on copyright restrictions. Separate different tags with a comma.

    To include a comma in your tag, surround the tag with double quotes. Please enable cookies in your browser to get the full Trove experience. Skip to content Skip to search. Consumer behaviour: Don Jordan, Antipodes Indexing. Solomon, Michael R. Physical Description 1 online resource pages: Published Melbourne, VIC: Check copyright status Cite this Title Consumer behaviour: Author Solomon, Michael R.

    Other Authors Russell-Bennet, Rebekah, author. Previte, Josephine, author. Jordan, Don, writer of supplementary textual content. Edition 4th edition.

    Content Types text still image Carrier Types online resource Physical Description 1 online resource pages: Subjects Consumer behavior -- Australia. Australian Summary The only Australian-adapted marketing text that utilises up-to-date content and provides a multi-perspective approach for students and instructors. Readers are provided with a balanced look of the complexity of consumer behaviour theory with the need to make sense of the concepts for the real world.

    The ideas presented are grounded in real-world examples to bring to life the research upon which the text is built. A blend of contemporary and distinctive theories have been integrated, representing cognitive, emotional, behavioural and cultural schools of thought throughout the book. The full text downloaded to your computer With eBooks you can: Upon download, you will receive via email the code and instructions on how to access this product. Time limit The eBooks products do not have an expiry date.

    You will continue to access your digital ebook products whilst you have your Bookshelf installed. Consumer behaviour is more than downloading things; it also embraces the study of how having or not having things affects our lives and how possessions influence the way we feel about ourselves and each other - our state of being.

    This book is presented in a contemporary framework based around the downloading, having and being model and in an Australasian context. A high in need for cognition B superprocessors C utility maximizers D cognitive misers Answer: D Diff: 2 Learning Outcome: Identify and discuss the factors influencing consumer buying behavior.

    Skill: Application Objective: 41 Coca-Cola is most likely an example of a n product because it characterizes an entire category of soft drinks.

    Skill: Application Objective: AACSB: Analytical thinking 42 Kraft has repackaged its salad dressings as "anything" dressings to encourage people to shift their and consider the dressings as a complement to more than just salads.

    A demonstration signals B knowledge structures C mental maps D mean-end chains Answer: B Diff: 2 Learning Outcome: Identify and discuss the factors influencing consumer buying behavior. Eat your foreign car. The attitude expressed by the stickers is best described as. A national inertia B lexicographic determinism C stereotyping D ethnocentrism Answer: D Diff: 2 Learning Outcome: Identify and discuss the factors influencing consumer buying behavior. Skill: Application Objective: AACSB: Diverse and multicultural work environments 44 Latrell finds that every time he goes to select athletic shoes, he always buys the same brand.

    In fact, he doesn't even remember trying on any of the other competitive brands even though some of these brands have attractive styles and prices. Latrell's purchase decision process has become one of less and less effort. Latrell's decision process is an example of. A cognitive dissonance B information discrimination C cognitive miser behavior D inertia Answer: D Diff: 2 Learning Outcome: Identify and discuss the factors influencing consumer buying behavior.

    He did not look at price, the store, or even discounts when purchasing clubs. Chen Lo's purchasing pattern is an example of a consumer using a rule. A habitual decision B compensatory C noncompensatory D conjunctive Answer: C Diff: 2 Learning Outcome: Identify and discuss the factors influencing consumer buying behavior.

    Which of the following best explains the gamblers' behavior? A Mental accounting emphasizes the extraneous characteristics of the choice environment even if the results are not rational. B Most people are unaware of the true risk of making certain decisions and believe that a larger wager has higher odds of winning. C The luxurious surroundings increase the probability of classical conditioning through mere exposure, which results in behavior that is not rational.

    D The functional risk of gambling is decreased in luxurious surroundings, leading gamblers to wager more. Answer: A Diff: 3 Learning Outcome: Identify and discuss the factors influencing consumer buying behavior. The company put the product on the market as a substitute for breakfast for busy people. The product failed. Craig Inventions then marketed the pill as a diet product and it became very successful. What does the example best demonstrate? A The company did not position the product well.

    It was difficult to convince consumers that a pill was a breakfast on the superordinate level; however, it did appear to fit appropriately within the superordinate category of diet pills.

    B The company confused a subordinate level with a basic level of categorization, which led to the company's failure to identify the product's most important competitors. C The company confused a superordinate level with a subordinate level of categorization.

    D The determinant attributes between diet pills and breakfast were not sufficiently strong. How should promotions differ between those emphasizing opportunities and those emphasizing needs?

    A Promotions emphasizing needs should attempt to increase the consumer's ideal state, while promotions emphasizing opportunities should simply give locations where the products can be found for purchase. B Promotions emphasizing opportunities should attempt to increase the ideal state, while promotions emphasizing needs should give locations where the products can be purchased. C Promotions emphasizing needs should increase the ideal state, while opportunity promotions should attempt to decrease the ideal state.

    D Promotions emphasizing needs should decrease the ideal state, while promotions emphasizing opportunities should provide buying locations.

    Answer: B Diff: 3 Learning Outcome: Identify and discuss the factors influencing consumer buying behavior. Skill: Concept Objective: AACSB: Reflective thinking 49 What is a major distinction between customers who purchase a product because they are brand loyal and those who purchase by inertia?

    A the cost of the product B the social risk of the product C whether the purchase is made after a compensatory or noncompensatory decision process D whether the customers hold a very positive or weak attitude toward the product Answer: D Diff: 2 Learning Outcome: Identify and discuss the factors influencing consumer buying behavior.

    She applied a heuristic in judging men. They must wear expensive shoes and have an expensive automobile. What type of decision rule was Ellen most likely applying in her search for a millionaire husband? A lexicographic rule B elimination-by-aspects C conjunctive rule D weighted additive rule Answer: B Diff: 3 Learning Outcome: Identify and discuss the factors influencing consumer buying behavior. Skill: Concept Objective: 52 Traditionally, consumer researchers have approached the study of decision making from an information-processing perspective.

    ISBN 13: 9780130913609

    Skill: Concept Objective: 53 The experiential perspective stresses the importance of learning in decision-making. Skill: Concept Objective: 54 Habitual decision-making is the lowest order of buying decision-making. Skill: Concept Objective: 55 Needs are created when the actual state of a customer declines.

    Skill: Concept Objective: 56 Incidental learning occurs after a very concentrated search for information. Skill: Concept Objective: 57 People often engage in brand switching, even when their current brand satisfies their needs. Skill: Concept Objective: 58 Decisions are influenced by the way a problem is posed. This is called framing. Skill: Concept Objective: 59 The research on loss aversion suggests that people tend to emphasize their losses more than their gains.

    Skill: Concept Objective: 60 Social risk occurs when the consumer's risk capital consists of self-esteem and selfconfidence. Skill: Concept Objective: 61 Alternatives a consumer knows about are his evoked set, and the ones that he actually considers are called his consideration set. Skill: Concept Objective: 62 The success of a positioning strategy hinges on the marketer's ability to convince the consumer to consider its product within a given category.

    Skill: Concept Objective: AACSB: Application of knowledge 63 Neuromarketing refers to the use of software tools that try to understand and then apply a human decision maker's multiattribute preferences for a product category. Skill: Concept Objective: AACSB: Application of knowledge 65 If a consumer is following the lexicographic rule in her decision making, then she would select a brand that is the best on the most important attribute.

    He thinks to himself, How stupid I am! Cedric has just experienced a form of problem recognition that is being dominated by a downward movement in his actual state. As she heads to the soft drink aisle in her grocery store, she decides that today is the day to experience root beer again. Claire has just conducted what is called an internal search for information. It came with one-pound hamburger and a full bucket of fries. Halfway through the meal, Hirosi was not feeling well. Yet according to the sunk-cost fallacy, Hirosi will likely continue until he has finished the "special.

    She is extremely knowledgeable about her product line. One of her clients wants to purchase a rug made by a supplier with whom she has had little contact. Eun-Hee is more likely to engage in a broader search for information and gather more opinions from others about this new product than someone who was only moderately knowledgeable about the product line. He tries to make every purchase decision a wise one because of his economic situation.

    Consumer Behavior: Buying, Having, and Being, Global Edition

    Based on the types of risk mentioned in the text, Sylvester's primary risk when making decisions would appear to be a psychological risk. Because his car is very old, he really doesn't care about any other qualities. Jonesy is most likely using the noncompensatory decision rule.

    Skill: Concept Objective: AACSB: Reflective thinking 75 The concepts of mental accounting, prospect theory, and perceived risk all remind a marketer that the customer's perception is more important than an objective reality when trying to understand consumer behavior. Answer: The five stages are problem recognition, information search, evaluation of alternatives, product choice, and outcomes.

    Problem recognition occurs whenever the consumer sees a significant difference between his or her current state of affairs and some desired or ideal state. Information search is the process by which the consumer surveys his or her environment for appropriate data to make a reasonable decision. Evaluation of alternatives—During this phase, the consumer evaluates the products in his or her consideration set.

    Product choice—A product is or is not chosen to solve the buyer's problem. Outcomes—If a product is selected, it will either be satisfactory or unsatisfactory. If no product is selected, the process may begin again at a future time. Diff: 2 Learning Outcome: Identify and discuss the factors influencing consumer buying behavior. Answer: The three types of decision-making emphasized in the text were: a. Cognitive —in this view, people calmly and carefully integrate as much information as possible with what they already know about a product, painstakingly weigh the pluses and minuses of each alternative, and arrive at a satisfactory decision.

    Habitual —this perspective is important when consumers have a low level of involvement. Marketers must concentrate on assessing the characteristics of the environment that influence members of a target market, such as the design of a retail outlet or whether a package is enticing. The environment has an effect on the decisions to be made. Affective —in these cases, the decision making is emotional and spontaneous. Diff: 1 Learning Outcome: Identify and discuss the factors influencing consumer buying behavior.

    Answer: Loss aversion means that people place much more emphasis on loss than they do on gain. Student examples will vary. Describe two typical heuristics used in consumer decision-making situations. Answer: Heuristics are mental shortcut "rules of thumb" consumers use to save time and effort in the decision-making process. Heuristics may be based upon previous experience, reports from others, or beliefs. They may range from the very general e. Novice consumers may in fact consider price as the only relevant product attribute.

    A common example is the clean and shiny exterior of a used car up for sale. Consumers lacking knowledge may use signals such as how long the company has been in business, how well-known the brand name is, price, and so forth—judgments that may be faulty.

    For example, locally owned stores give the best service, all brands are basically the same, and so on. Certain items associated with specific countries may benefit from these linkages; for example, shoes made in Italy are prized. Diff: 3 Learning Outcome: Identify and discuss the factors influencing consumer buying behavior. Describe the types of rules that fall under this category. Answer: When consumers consider attributes of several product choices, they may follow a simple noncompensatory decision rule, meaning that they feel a product with a high standing on one attribute cannot "make up for" or compensate for poor performance on another.

    Strong attributes do not compensate for weak ones. In the event of a tie, brands are evaluated on the next most important attribute. If that feature is not present, the alternative is rejected. The brand must meet all cutoffs to be considered. Answer: Covariation means that people will often make judgments about aspects of the product that they cannot really judge by using other aspects which are visible.

    Skill: Application Objective: AACSB: Application of knowledge 82 Explain the concept of narrative transportation and provide an example of a time from your own life that this state was triggered by an ad. Answer: Narrative transportation means that people become immersed in the storyline being told in the ad.

    Show how problems can arise. Give a brief example to illustrate the problem recognition process. Answer: Problem recognition occurs whenever the consumer sees a significant difference between his or her current state of affairs and some desired or ideal state.

    Problem recognition can occur in two ways: a there is a downward movement of the actual state a person runs out of gas or b there is an upward movement in the ideal state such as a person craving something that he or she does not currently have, like a faster car.

    Skill: Application Objective: AACSB: Reflective thinking 84 Why would customers with a moderate knowledge of a product seek more information than either someone with no information or someone with extensive knowledge? Answer: People with a very limited expertise may not feel they are capable of searching extensively. They are more likely to use shortcuts and utilize more abstract sources even when a search is undertaken.

    Free PDF Consumer Behavior: Buying, Having, and Being (11th Edition) …

    People with extensive knowledge already have the information they need or have most likely already learned how to successfully navigate the process. Skill: Application Objective: AACSB: Reflective thinking 85 Purchase decisions that involve extensive search also entail some kind of perceived risk a belief that the purchase potentially could have negative consequences.

    Name five perceived risks, indicate the kinds of consumers most vulnerable to each risk, and indicate the types of purchases most sensitive to each. Answer: The five basic kinds of risk include both objective e.

    Consumers with greater "risk capital" are less affected by perceived risks associated with purchases. Those with relatively little income and wealth are most vulnerable.

    Purchases most sensitive to it: high-ticket items that require a substantial expenditure such as cars and houses. Practical consumers are the most sensitive. Purchases most sensitive to it: products or services whose purchase and use requires the buyer's exclusive commitment and precludes redundancy. Those who are elderly, frail, or in ill health are most vulnerable.

    Purchases sensitive to it: mechanical or electrical goods such as vehicles, flammables , drugs and medical treatment, food and beverages.

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